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Check if you can increase your income

Mae’r cyngor hwn yn berthnasol i Cymru

You might be able to increase your income by doing things like:

  • claiming benefits
  • checking you're being paid the right wage
  • getting help from charities
  • renting out a room
  • getting child maintenance

Check if you can claim benefits

You might be able to claim benefits if you’re either:

  • on a low income
  • looking for work
  • sick or disabled
  • a carer
  • a parent or guardian
  • pregnant

Use a benefits calculator to find out what benefits you could get and how to apply.

You'll need information about your savings, income, pension, childcare payments and any benefits that you or your partner get.

If you're over 18, you can use the Turn2us benefits calculator.

If you’re under 18, find out about benefits you might be able to claim on the Turn2Us website.

Check you’re being paid the right wage

Check the National Minimum Wage calculator on GOV.UK to see if you’re being paid the right amount. You can also check if your employer owes you money.

If you’re not being paid the right amount, start by having an informal conversation with your employer. If they agree they’ve made a mistake, ask them to pay you what you’re owed.

Get help speaking to your employer if you’re not being paid minimum wage. You should do this as soon as possible because there’s a 3 month time limit on when you can make a claim against your employer.

If this doesn’t help, contact your nearest Citizens Advice. They can help you take further action, such as raising a formal grievance.

Check deductions from your wages are correct

Your employer might take money from your wages before you’re paid. These are called ‘deductions’. Deductions can include:

  • things required by law, such as tax, national insurance and student loan repayments
  • things you've agreed to, such as pension contributions
  • money taken to pay a creditor directly

Check when your employer can make deductions from your pay on GOV.UK.

If you think your employer is making deductions they shouldn’t, or that the amount taken is wrong, contact your nearest Citizens Advice. They can help you challenge the deductions your employer is making.

Check you’re paying the right amount of tax

You don’t have to pay tax on everything you earn. You can earn an amount tax-free that’s your ‘personal allowance’.

You might pay less tax if:

  • you're married or in a civil partnership
  • you're registered blind
  • you spend money on things that are essential for your job

If you’re married or in a civil partnership

You might be able to save on the amount of tax you pay if you’re married or in a civil partnership.

If you were born on or after 6 April 1935

You can claim Marriage Allowance if:

  • you're earning less than £11,850 a year
  • your husband, wife or civil partner earns between £11,851 and £46,350 a year

The allowance lets you transfer some of your Personal Allowance to your partner - this means they can save on the tax they pay.

You can apply for Marriage Allowance on GOV.UK.

If you or your partner were born before 6 April 1935

You can claim Married Couple’s Allowance. This could save you between £336 and £869.50 a year.

Use the Married Couple’s Allowance calculator on GOV.UK to find out what you could get.

If you’re registered blind

You can claim Blind Person’s Allowance if you’re registered with your local council as blind or severely sight impaired. You’ll be able to earn an extra amount tax-free - this is on top of your Personal Allowance.

You have to claim Blind Person’s Allowance - you won’t get it automatically. Check how to claim on GOV.UK.

If you spend your own money on things that are essential for your job

You can sometimes pay less tax if you have to spend your own money on things that are essential for your job - this is called ‘tax relief’.

You can’t claim tax relief on things you also use outside of work, or if your employer pays you back for what you’ve spent.

Things you could claim tax relief for include:

  • special clothing for work, such as a uniform or protective clothing
  • membership of professional bodies
  • tools for your job

Check if you can get tax relief and how to claim on GOV.UK.

If you’ve recently lost your job

You might be able to get back some of the tax you paid while you were working. This is called a ‘tax refund’ or sometimes a ‘tax rebate’.

You might be able to get a tax refund if you lost your job part way through the tax year and you were paying tax through PAYE.

You can check if you can claim a tax refund on GOV.UK.

If you’ve been made redundant

If you’ve been in the same job for 2 years or more you’ll usually get redundancy pay.

The minimum amount you should get is called ‘statutory redundancy pay’. For each full year you’ve worked for your employer you can get:

  • half a week's pay if you're aged 18 to 22
  • 1 week's pay if you're aged 22 to 40
  • 1.5 weeks' pay if you're aged 41 and over

Check how much redundancy pay you can get.

If you have children from a previous relationship

You might be able to get payments to help with the living costs of your child if the other parent doesn’t live with you. Usually the parent who doesn’t have day-to-day care of the child makes regular payments to the parent who does. This is called ‘child maintenance’ or sometimes ‘child support’.

You can arrange child maintenance payments with the other parent yourself. Use the child maintenance calculator on GOV.UK to work out how much payments should be.

If you can’t reach an agreement with the other parent get help from the Child Maintenance Service.

Check if you can get help with your energy bills

You might be able to get grants, benefits or other help from the government or energy suppliers.

If you were born on or before 5 November 1953

You’ll usually be able to get a one-off payment to help you pay for heating during the winter - this is called ‘Winter Fuel Payment’.

Winter Fuel Payment is usually between £100 and £300. Find out how to claim on GOV.UK.

If you’re in debt to your energy supplier

You might be able to get a grant from a charitable trust to help pay your energy debts. Some energy companies offer grants that are open to anyone, others are just for their customers.

Your application is more likely to be successful if you’ve received debt advice. Contact your nearest Citizens Advice for help with your application.

Check if you could get a discount on your electricity bill

You could get money off your electricity bill under the Warm Home Discount Scheme if you:

  • get the Guarantee Credit element of Pension Credit
  • are on a low income

You can check if your supplier offers the scheme and find out how to apply on GOV.UK.

Check if you can get help from your local council

If you get certain benefits you could get vouchers or a prepaid card to help pay for essentials like food or fuel. You could also get household appliances like a fridge or a cooker. This is called ‘welfare assistance’.

Each council runs its own welfare assistance scheme so what you can get depends on where you live. You can usually apply for help if you get either:

  • income-based Employment and Support Allowance
  • income-related Jobseeker's Allowance
  • Pension Credit
  • Universal Credit

Contact your local council and ask if they run a welfare assistance scheme. You can find out how to contact your local council on GOV.UK.

Get a discretionary housing payment to help pay your rent

If you get Housing Benefit or the housing costs part of Universal Credit and still can’t afford your rent, you could apply for a discretionary housing payment (DHP).

Your local council doesn’t have to give you a DHP - it depends on your circumstances. If your local council agrees to give you a DHP they’ll tell you:

  • how much you'll get
  • when the payments will stop

If you still need help after your DHP stops you can apply again.

Contact your local council and ask how to apply. You can find out how to contact your local council on GOV.UK.

Other ways to get more money

You might be able to get money from:

  • local or national charities
  • a budgeting loan or advance - if you're on certain benefits
  • other adults who live with you
  • renting out a spare room in your home
  • a pension, if you're over 55

Get help from charities

You might be able to get extra money from a charity. Some of these grants are open to everyone, others might be available to you based on your situation - such as your job or health.

Use the Turn2Us grant search to find charities that could help.

Get help with your savings

If you’re on a low income and get Universal Credit or Working Tax Credits, you might be able to get help from the government with your savings. 

Find out more about Help to Save on GOV.UK.

Get an interest-free budgeting loan

If you claim certain benefits you might be able to get a budgeting loan. This can help pay for essential goods like clothing or a washing machine.

Budgeting loans are interest-free, so you'll only have to pay back what you borrow.

You'll usually need to pay back the loan within 2 years.

You might be able to get a budgeting loan if you get:

  • Income Support
  • income-based Jobseeker's Allowance
  • income-related Employment and Support Allowance
  • Pension Credit

Check what you could get and how to apply on GOV.UK.

You can't get a budgeting loan if you’re on Universal Credit. You can apply for a budgeting advance instead.

If other adults live with you

Having another adult in your home can affect the benefits you get. For example, it might mean you’re not able to get the single-person discount on council tax. It also means household bills such as energy and water might be higher.

If other adults live with you make sure you’re splitting the bills fairly. If you’ve got grown up children still living with you ask them to pay board.

Renting out a room in your home

If you have a spare room you might want to rent it out as a source of income. There are things you should check before renting out a room including:

  • if you need permission from your landlord or mortgage lender
  • how any extra income might affect the benefits you receive
  • if you'll lose the 25% single person discount on your council tax

If you’re a taxpayer the Rent a Room Scheme allows you to earn £7,500 a year tax free by renting out a room in your home.

Check how to join the Rent a Room Scheme on GOV.UK.

If you’re over 55 and have a personal pension

You might be able to take some money from your pension savings to help pay for essential costs, or to pay off your debts.

Taking money from your pension will mean you’ve less income when you retire. If you’re getting benefits it could affect your claim.

You should get financial advice before taking any money from your pension savings - you’ll have to pay. Check how to find a financial adviser - they can tell you which option is best for you.

You can also get free guidance on your pension options from Pension Wise. They’ll explain the different options so you can decide which is best for you.

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