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Get help from the Witness Service

This advice applies to England

You can get free and confidential help from the Witness Service if you’re going to court because you’re:

  • the victim of a crime

  • a witness to a crime - you might be a witness for the prosecution or the defence

  • a family member or friend of someone who died because of a crime

Check what help you can get from the Witness Service

If you live in London

The Witness Service can give you help on the day you go to court and after the trial.

The Witness Service can’t give you help before the trial - you can get help from Victim Support instead.

Victim Support

Email: IVWS@victimsupport.org.uk

Telephone: 0808 168 9291

Monday to Sunday, 24 hours a day

Calls are free

Website: www.victimsupport.org.uk

You can choose the help you want from the Witness Service.

You can get help before, during and after the trial. If you want help before the trial, you should contact the Witness Service as soon as possible.

If you haven’t contacted the Witness Service before you go to court, you can still get help. When you arrive at the court, ask the person on reception if you can talk to someone from the Witness Service.

Get help to understand the court process 

You can get help to understand what’s going to happen before, during and after the trial. 

The Witness Service will help you understand your rights as a witness. For example, they can help you find the form to claim expenses for travelling to and from the court.

Talk to someone about going to court 

You can talk to someone from the Witness Service about any worries you have. You can talk to them before the trial, either on the phone or by video call.

Someone from the Witness Service can also help you on the day of the trial. For example, they can talk to you while you wait or sit with you in court.

Find out what a court is like

The Witness Service can help you find out what a court looks like and what will happen. For example, you can either:

  • visit a court with someone from the Witness Service - they can show you around 

  • talk to someone from the Witness Service on the phone or a video call - they’ll tell you about the court

Get access to emotional or practical support

If you’re struggling, the Witness Service can arrange for you to get support. They can help you get:

  • emotional support, like counselling

  • specialist support for the type of crime you witnessed or were a victim of - for example, if you experienced domestic abuse

  • help from your local Citizens Advice - for example, if you’re having problems with things like housing, debt or work

Contact the Witness Service

You can contact the Witness Service by phone or email, or you can fill in an online form. You’ll get the same help however you get in touch.

If you call on the phone, you’ll get help straight away. If you email or fill in the online form, someone will reply to you within 2 working days.

Call on the phone

Telephone: 0300 332 1000

Relay UK - if you can't hear or speak on the phone, you can type what you want to say: 18001 then 0300 332 1000.

You can use Relay UK with an app or a textphone. There’s no extra charge to use it. Find out how to use Relay UK on the Relay UK website.

You can call the Witness Service Monday to Friday, 9am to 6pm.

Calls to this number can cost up to 16p a minute from a landline, or between 8p and 40p a minute from a mobile. Your phone supplier can tell you how much you’ll pay.

Send an email 

When you write your email, make sure you include how you want the Witness Service to contact you - for example, by email or phone. 

If you want the Witness Service to contact you by phone, make sure you include your phone number in your email.

Email: WSreferralhub@citizensadvice.org.uk

Fill in an online form

You can fill in the Witness Service online referral form.

Check if you can get extra help giving evidence

If you have extra needs that mean you might struggle when you give evidence, there are ways the court can help you. These are called ‘special measures’. 

You can check if you can get special measures from the court.

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