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Change of circumstances while you're getting Child Disability Payment

This advice applies to Scotland

When to report a change of circumstances

You should tell Social Security Scotland within 1 month if there's a change of circumstances while you're getting Child Disability Payment. For example, if a child needs more help or their condition improves. This might affect the amount of Child Disability Payment you get.

You should tell Social Security Scotland if:

  • your personal or contact details change
  • a child’s condition gets better or worse
  • the level of help and care they need changes
  • the support they need with their mobility changes
  • they go into or leave residential care or residential education
  • they move away from Scotland
  • they enter or leave legal detention.

You can tell Social Security Scotland about a change of circumstances by:

You should tell Social Security Scotland about a change within 1 month, or as soon as can reasonably be expected after the change has happened. For example, if a change to a child's condition is gradual or fluctuates, then it might take longer than a month for you to reasonably be expected to notice the change.

If you don’t tell Social Security Scotland about a change in circumstances, you might be overpaid. If this happens, you might be asked to pay the money back.

Find out how Social Security Scotland decides if you have to repay an overpayment.

You might also be committing a criminal offence.

Find out more about reporting a change of circumstances.

Who else you need to tell

If Child Disability Payment stops, increases or is reduced because of a change of circumstances, this might affect other benefits you get. For example, if you stop getting Child Disability Payment, this might affect benefits like Carer’s Allowance or Universal Credit and the benefit cap might start to apply. 

You should tell your other benefit provider about any changes to your Child Disability Payment.

If a child’s condition changes

If a child's condition has changed, for example, it has improved or got worse, Social Security Scotland might carry out a review, to see if they still meet the conditions for Child Disability Payment and are getting the correct components and rate. 

You might be asked to provide some supporting information about the change to your child's condition. You can provide this with the change of circumstances form or send it separately.

If you don't agree with the review decision, you can ask for this to be looked at again. You usually need to ask within 42 days of getting the review decision.

If you move home

You should tell Social Security Scotland if you move home.

If you move to another part of the UK 

If you move to another part of the UK, you’ll be able to get Child Disability Payment for up to 13 weeks and then it will stop. This is to give you time to apply for and receive child Disability Living Allowance (DLA) instead. The amount of DLA you get might be the same, more, or less than the amount of Child Disability Payment you were getting.

You should tell Social Security Scotland that you’ve moved.

If you move to Scotland from another part of the UK 

If you get Disability Living Allowance (DLA) for a child and you move to Scotland from another part of the UK, you need to tell the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) in England and Wales or the Department for Communities (DfC) in Northern Ireland of the date of your move.

You’ll keep getting DLA until you're transferred to Child Disability Payment. Social Security Scotland will write to tell you when that will happen.

You won’t have to re-apply and Child Disability Payment will be paid at the same rate as your DLA.

Find out more about transferring from DLA to Child Disability Payment on mygov.scot.

If a child is in a care home or residential school

Child Disability Payment can be affected if a child has overnight stays in a care home or residential school.

If a child is in a residential school or care home (including for short breaks) and this is paid for from public funds:

  • the care component will stop being paid after 28 days. The days that your child goes into and leaves residential care aren’t counted
  • the mobility component isn’t affected.

You'll still get the care component if the child’s stay in a residential school or care home is funded by you, someone else or a charity.

Getting paid for the days a child is at home

If Child Disability Payment care component stops because a child is in a residential setting, you’ll still be entitled to daily rates of the care component for the nights they spend at home.

For example, if your child has been away at residential school for more than 28 days, payments of Child Disability Payment care component will stop. If they come home from school on Friday and go back on Monday, the care component should be paid at a daily rate for Friday, Saturday, Sunday and Monday (4 days).

Short breaks

If a child goes into publicly funded residential care for a short break, your Child Disability Payment care component might be affected.

Short stays in residential care that are separated by less than 28 days will be added together. Once these short breaks add up to a total of 28 days, your care component will stop.

If a child spends at least 29 days at home before another short break then the link between the breaks is broken and they won’t be added together. This means that if the child goes back into residential care for another short break, they’ll have another period of 28 days before the care component is stopped again.

The rules are complex and can affect your entitlement to other benefits. Get advice from a Citizens Advice Bureau.

Payment of the care component of Child Disability Payment will stop after 28 days if a child is detained in legal custody. The days that a child goes into and leaves legal detention aren’t counted. The mobility component can still be paid while they’re in custody.

If a child goes into hospital or a hospice

Child Disability Payment will still be paid if a child goes into hospital or a hospice. 

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